Noah’s Ark (1846), a painting by the American folk painter Edward Hicks
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Noah’s Ark (Hebrew: תיבת נח‎; Biblical Hebrew: Tevat Noaḥ) is the vessel in the Genesis flood narrative (Genesis chapters 6–9) by which God saves Noah, his family, and a remnant of all the world’s animals from the flood.[1][2] According to Genesis, God gave Noah instructions for building the ark. Seven days before the deluge, God told Noah to enter the ark with his household and the animals. The story goes on to describe the ark being afloat throughout the flood and subsequent receding of the waters before it came to rest on the Mountains of Ararat. The story is repeated, with variations, in the Quran, where the ark appears as Safina Nuh (Arabic: سفينة نوح‎ “Noah’s boat”). The Genesis flood narrative is similar to numerous other flood myths from a variety of cultures. The earliest known written flood myth is the Sumerian flood myth found in the Epic of Ziusudra.[3] There is no scientific evidence supporting a global flood.[4] Searches for Noah’s Ark have been made from at least the time of Eusebius (c.275–339 CE) to the present day. Despite many expeditions, no scientific evidence of the ark has been found.[5][6][7][8][9]


 

The last entry on Wikipedia says “no scientific evidence of the ark has been found” – that is until Ron Wyatt, his family and his team came along and found the ark.

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